Digital Day of Learning​

Digital Days of Education

  • Wednesday, April 15
  • Wednesday, April 22
  • Wednesday, April 29

In an effort to continue our mission of saving lives through education, Infrastructure Resources is offering three FREE Digital Days of Education to Full Conference delegates who were unable to participate in the cancelled Palm Springs event due to COVID-19. We know nothing can replace the value of face-to-face interaction, but we believe that even in these uncertain times, access to continued education is vital to the protection of our buried infrastructure.

If you registered as a Full Conference delegate in Palm Springs, you can attend one session or all fifteen at NO CHARGE. Register below for the sessions you are interested in to have the attendee link sent to you.

Education Sessions

Wednesday, April 15

10:00 am – 10:40 am

Lindsay Sander, Sander Resources

Join us for a session on using the FREE Safe Excavator App, a useful tool dedicated to providing important information related to excavation and safety at your fingertips.  Participants can test their knowledge and learn about features of the App including how it can be utilized in your daily operations, connect and make a one call request, and collect and provide information to DIRT.

11:00 am – 11:40 am

Dan Lorenz, Joe Knows

Addressing the challenge of elevating the performance of QA/QC workforce in an environment of increasing complexity and a shortage of talent. We utilize “Human Factors” technologies, industry surveys and case studies to develop solutions.

12:00 pm – 12:40 pm

Josef Rosenberg, Alberta One-Call

In recent years, there has been an increased push from One-Call groups toward a self-served, web-based locate submission system. While the merits of an increase in online requests are readily apparent from an economic standpoint, exactly how much economic impact can it have on a One-Call provider and their Membership, and is there any effect on the safety of the resulting excavations?

1:00 pm – 1:40 pm

Michael Worster, Worster Construction Management

Damage Prevention has many meanings; but for utility operators, damage prevention must have a single meaning, and an unmistakable and unified mission.  This is why examining the differences between the collaboration needed for damages that occur in California on joint use aerial plant versus underground plant becomes a case study in how systematic damage prevention and compliance operations offers real solutions in such a challenging industry, and in one of the most complicated markets.

2:00 pm – 2:40 pm

Ricky Rollins

Ricky will tell the story of how he almost lost his life in a workplace accident 25 years ago and how his family would have been affected if he had died that day.  He will also tell 4 more stories from the perspective of husband, father, brother, friend. coworker, supervisor, and department manager about the things that have affected his circle. Some good things and some not so good. But in each story will be a message and lesson for the audience use for themselves and their own circle.

Wednesday, April 22

10:00 am – 10:40 am

Paul Andersen

During this presentation, we will discuss steps you may take to successfully blend safety culture and damage prevention in order to achieve workplace and public safety. We will share techniques on how to present clear expectations, employee responsibilities, how accountability will be achieved and methods of engaging employee support.

11:00 am – 11:40 am

Mel Christopher, Gold Shovel Association

Using standard measurement, baseline and targets improves overall performance – we know this from OHSA and DART historical information. Having standardized measurements allows people to have a common point of reference and speak the same language. This is an important step towards being able to improve over time and have better clarity into the effectiveness of certain actions. Collaborating with various stakeholders in the excavation/underground asset arena allows the development of standardized metrics around the various parts of damage prevention. These measurements can help improve overall performance, reduce damage to underground infrastructure and improve public safety.

12:00 pm – 12:40 pm

Jeff Lyons, Builterra

As one of the oldest American cities and the site of many important events during the country’s founding, Boston’s rich history gives it an obvious allure. But that history and culture isn’t limited to what can be found above ground.
Many of the large infrastructure projects completed between the late 1890’s and the late 1920’s in Massachusetts are still in use, providing vital energy, communication, water, and transportation systems for our growing communities. The preservation of this infrastructure and insights gleaned from the practices used to create it can provide us with valuable lessons in how to continue standards of excellence in major development, even as we use emerging new technologies to do the work.

1:00 pm – 1:40 pm

Joe Wise, United Rentals

This presentation includes a review of the results from a 2019 trench survey, conducted by CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, created to reveal potential factors that may contribute to the alarming rise in trench fatalities. As we consider those results, we will review the responsibilities of the Competent Person and what they need to manage on a project with regard to soils, underground installations and the safety of the workers. We will conclude by discussing common and uncommon solutions for protecting workers and underground installations alike.

2:00 pm – 2:40 pm

Jim Hayes, Fiber Optic Association

Everyone knows fiber optic cables are being run everywhere, a necessity for supporting wireless small cells and 5G, FTTH/business, intelligent traffic systems and all the traditional metro and telecom networks. To reduce the cost of installation, contractors try new installation methods that may affect their coexistence with other underground utilities. We’ll describe what is being used and provide some insight into what it means in today’s world.

Wednesday, April 29

10:00 am – 10:40 am

AJ Clark, Omni Damage Prevention

This session will describe how to locate and map complex oil and gas infrastructure. Locating complex oil and gas infrastructure is challenging. Congested, abandoned, unknown, and non-conducting underground infrastructure lead to inaccurate and incomplete facility records. This presentation shows how to use advanced locate methods and effective data management to create a continually improving Damage Prevention process. Clearly sharing gathered information with excavators greatly reduces line strikes.

11:00 am – 11:40 am

Chris Thompson, Subsite Electronics

In the underground construction world, we have an end goal of utilizing data, including GPS information and GIS systems, to create a more thorough awareness of asset location underground. Additionally, in the effort to help reduce future utility strikes, utility mapping with GPS and importing the data into GIS systems is becoming increasingly desired in the underground construction industry. In this session, attendees will learn about incorporating GPS information into their as-built reports and using GPS with their as-builts to win and/or add value to their jobs.  Additionally, attendees will learn how product currently in the market answers the need for GPS integration and GIS import. 

12:00 pm – 12:40 pm

Bruce Magee, United Rentals

Even though OSHA’s construction industry-focused confined space regulations have been out since 2015, there is still much confusion as to exactly which Standard should be followed. This presentation will help to clarify and address the misunderstanding between when workers should follow the General Industry Standard, 1910.146, and the Construction Industry Standard, 1926 Subpart AA. Keeping those clarifications in mind, we will then address the importance of training your workers on the proper standard and provide ways to ensure everyone is compliant and safe.

1:00 pm – 1:40 pm

Michael Twohig, DGT Associates

As one of the oldest American cities and the site of many important events during the country’s founding, Boston’s rich history gives it an obvious allure. But that history and culture isn’t limited to what can be found above ground.
Many of the large infrastructure projects completed between the late 1890’s and the late 1920’s in Massachusetts are still in use, providing vital energy, communication, water, and transportation systems for our growing communities. The preservation of this infrastructure and insights gleaned from the practices used to create it can provide us with valuable lessons in how to continue standards of excellence in major development, even as we use emerging new technologies to do the work.

2:00 pm – 2:40 pm

Alec Pestov, vGIS

As one of the oldest American cities and the site of many important events during the country’s founding, Boston’s rich history gives it an obvious allure. But that history and culture isn’t limited to what can be found above ground.
Many of the large infrastructure projects completed between the late 1890’s and the late 1920’s in Massachusetts are still in use, providing vital energy, communication, water, and transportation systems for our growing communities. The preservation of this infrastructure and insights gleaned from the practices used to create it can provide us with valuable lessons in how to continue standards of excellence in major development, even as we use emerging new technologies to do the work.

Learn More about Infrastructure Resources Initiatives

dp-Pro

ESG

GESC

LSAW

Published quarterly, dp-PRO reaches over 70,000 readers each issue in print and digital formats.  We keep our finger on the pulse of the industry.

The Excavation Safety Guide is an annual publication offering in-depth articles written by industry experts outlining the excavation process from pre-planning to job completion. 

Established in 2004, the Global Excavation Safety Conference is the premiere international event in the damage prevention industry. 

Locator Safety Awareness Week takes place in the last full week of April and addresses the need to keep locators safe on the job.